ORIGIN, CLASSIFICATION ANDDISTRIBUTION OF SALT-AFFECTED SOILS

SALINE SOILS AND THEIR MANAGEMENT

Local and regional scales have been impacted.

However,it also affects other areas of the community:damaging infrastructure—buildings, roads, bridges and sewerage lines—andreducing the diversity of our native plants and animals. More than 1.8 million hectares in the south-west agricultural region of land in Western Australia is seriously affected by salinity.

Salinitycan have significant impacts on the following aspects:

SODIC SOILS AND THEIR MANAGEMENT" 4.

WATER QUALITY AND CROPPRODUCTION










SALINITY PROBLEMS OF THE DRYLAND REGIONS" 5.

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The main findings from this program are available in

Between 1993 and 2004 the National Dryland Salinity Program () provided a national forum for exchange of knowledge, building links and providing government, communities and individuals with the information and technology required to manage dryland salinity in Australia.

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A decade of research has provided many answers, but also demonstrates that there is still much to be done if we are to confidently identify the best management strategies for salinity in diverse situations. Tension still exists between farm and catchment-scale outcomes given conflicting national cost/benefit decisions made in respect to the options available at the respective scales. Over the period of this research the focus has shifted from salinity as largely an issue for agriculture, to an increasing awareness of the impact on infrastructure.

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While the research has given us valuable insights into the causes and the impacts, practical and economic solutions are still elusive and their effects may not be felt for decades. This highlights the importance of integrating salinity management with other natural resource management strategies, but also points to the likelihood that in some cases we will have to live with salinity and we need to find ways to make that practical and acceptable.

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The National Monitoring and Evaluation Framework (&) called for the identification of ‘matters for target’. Each matter for target has a set of ‘indicators’ used to monitor and report on the topic.

Includes bibliographic references.

In the light of this research, added to that of the first phase, six key messages emerge to guide our future response to salinity:

The problem of salinity in the Murray Darling Basin

Phase one (1993 - 1998) dramatically improved the level of coordination amongst researchers and has established much stronger linkages between community groups and the research community.