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Also, in 1991, Ebert reports that Spike Lee's made the statement that " . . . when blacks and whites go to bed with one another, they are motivated, not by love or affection, but by media-based myths about the sexual allure of the other race." has a slightly different slant on this Lee movie, saying, the film is another reminder that director Spike Lee " . . . has racial issues uppermost on his mind." If the Hollywood Reporter can make such statements about what is on Spike Lee’s mind, then it must be appropriate to speculate about what is on the minds of other Hollywood filmmakers whose films also repeat certain themes (see "Patterns of Bias: Movies Mirror Their Makers").

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(1990) starred Kiefer Sutherland as a " . . . young FBI man assigned to return . . . Dennis Hopper, a " . . . once famous . . . activist . . . " who has been " . . . in hiding for twenty years . . . to Spokane for trial . . . " and in the process the film provides a " . . . contrast between the values of the Summer of Love and the greed of the Me Decade." Also, in 1990, made the point that " . . . love and loss are more important than the mechanical distribution of guilt and justice." Ebert suggests that the movie is really " . . . about the values which people have, and about the things that mean more to them than life and freedom." 1990's represented the rare Hollywood film (independently produced by Vestron) that portrays a woman with intelligence. The movie " . . . presents . . . male authorities . . . who are blinded to the facts by their preconceptions about women in general and female cops in particular."

Also, in 1990, told " . . . about friendship and loyalty, about finding the courage to be helpful, and the humility to be helped." That same year, (1990) focuses on " . . . the greed of an entrepreneurial class that takes over perfectly efficient companies and steals their assets, that marches roughshod over timid laws in pursuit of its own aggrandizement, that rapes the environment, that enforces its tyranny on the timid majority--which distracts itself with romance and escapism to avoid facing up to the bullyboys." Ironically, once again, one of the primary vehicles of this sort of "escapism" is the Hollywood movie, and some of the most zealous adherents of this sort of greed are the Hollywood studio executives and agents.


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Also, that year, (1971) made the statement that "[m]ovies create our dreams as well as reflect them, and when we lose the movies we lose the dreams." Another 1971 offering, made the statement that " . . . children were the ones who suffered directly at the hands of class snobbism (in Britain) . . . and sometimes their personalities were marked for life." Finally, in 1971, was " . . . about the fierce love . . . " a father (Melvyn Douglas) and a son (Gene Hackman) have " . . . for each other, and about their inability to communicate that love, or very much of anything else . . . " The movie teaches the lesson that Hackman verbalizes in the movie: "Death ends a life. But it does not end a relationship."

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As David Prindle points out, "[b]ecause people learn things from their entertainment, every story is a potential vehicle for ideological messages. As with any art, the attitudes of the artists have always seeped into screen entertainment . . . " Brian Lowry adds that movies, just as television are powerful communicators of ideas. "There can be no greater endorsement or indictment of television than that taking over a nation's TV network seems to be a staple of any effort to overthrow a government. The medium's perceived power became evident again during the attempted coup (1993) against Russian leader Boris Yeltsin, as opponents waged a bloody battle to take over the TV network to control the flow of information." As noted earlier, Jane Kinosian believes that the images and ideas generated by film and television " . . . have seeped into and shaped our subconscious more than anything since maybe religion."

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Many intelligent people ranging from everyday moviegoers to justices of the U.S. Supreme Court have come to recognize that the motion picture is a significant medium for the communication of ideas. Only some of the major studio/distributor executives pretend not to know. Others such as the producers of the A&E channel's documentary about the American inventor of the motion picture camera and projector, go so far as to proclaim that the motion picture is " . . . the 20th century's most powerful communications medium."